EECS

1/17 Technology Predictions and Forecast

Talk Title:“2018 Technology Predictions and Forecast”  

Date: Jan 17, 2018 (Wednesday) 7:00 - 9:00 pm (Registration starts at 6:30pm)

Venue: ITRI Int’l, 2870 Zanker Rd., Suite #140, San Jose, CA

Come and learn more about some of the “Technology Predictions and Trends” for  this new year 2018!

 

Talk Title: “2018 Technology Predictions”  by Dr. William Kao

 

Talk Abstract: It is the beginning of the year 2018.

What are the technology trends that will dominate, and what are some of the technology predictions for 2018?

In this two hour seminar talk, Dr. William Kao will report on what the tech industry is predicting for 2018. He will cover what major firms and institutions such as Gartner, Forbes, Forrester Research, Computer World, Time Magazine are saying about this year: trends, facts and figures,  some predictions, projections and prognostications.

Focus will continue on IoT, AI and Machine Learning. Other technologies covered include: AR/VR, Big Data, Blockchain, etc.

 

 

Speaker Bio: Dr. William Kao received his BSEE, MSEE and PhD from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He worked in the Semiconductor and Electronic Design Automation industries for more than 30 years holding several senior and executive engineering management positions at Texas Instruments, Xerox Corporation, Cadence Design Systems.

Dr. Kao has authored more than 40 technical papers at IEEE Journals and Conferences, and holds eight software and IC design patents. He was an Adjunct Professor at UCLA Electrical Engineering Department where he taught courses in computer aided IC design.

Dr. Kao is a Senior Member of IEEE, and was one of the founding members of IEEE-Circuits and Systems - Silicon Valley Chapter, where he was Chapter Chair in 2005 and 2006.

Dr. Kao currently teaches Renewable Energy, Clean Technology and Business Sustainability courses at the University of California Santa Cruz, Silicon Valley Extension.  

Dr. Kao current interests include the subjects of Energy, Environment and Education.

He teaches and is a frequent lecturer on various Emerging Technologies including Clean Technology, Renewable Energy, Business Sustainability, Big Data, IoT, Smart Cities, Sensor Networks, Innovation, Augmented Reality, Robotics, AI and 3D Printing.

2/20 Bitcoin, Blockchain Technology and Crypto Currencies

Talk Title: “ Bitcoin, Blockchain Technology and Crypto Currencies”  

Date: February 20, 2018 (Tuesday) 7:00 - 9:00 pm (Registration starts at 6:30pm)

Venue: ITRI Int’l, 2870 Zanker Rd., Suite #140, San Jose, CA

Registrationhttps://ciesf2018blockchain.eventbrite.com

 

Talk Title: “Bitcoin, Blockchain Technology and Crypto Currencies”  by Dr. William Kao

 

Talk Abstract:  Few commodities are hotter right now than bitcoin, the world’s most popular digital currency, which has rocketed up to around $19,000 last week (Dec 18, 2017) from less than $1,000 since Jan. 1, 2017.

Bitcoin is a crypto currency and worldwide payment system.  It is the first decentralized digital currency, as the system works without a central bank or single administrator. The network is peer-to-peer and transactions take place between users directly through the use of cryptography, without an intermediary. These transactions are verified by network nodes and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain.

Currently, over 100,000 merchants and vendors accepted bitcoin as payment. Starting Dec 2017 ,Coinucopia, a Sacramento-based startup, offers instant access to bitcoin at automated teller machines in northern California, in locations as varied as the South Bay’s Westfield Valley Fair mall, a Berkeley gas station and an Oakland liquor store.

 September 2017 was rocky for bitcoin in which the digital currency briefly plunged more than $2,000 as China cracked down on crypto currencies and J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon called bitcoin a "fraud" that "won't end well."

Crypto currency is a medium of exchange like normal currencies such as USD, but designed for the purpose of exchanging digital information through a process made possible by certain principles of cryptography. Cryptography is used to secure the transactions and to control the creation of new coins. The first crypto currency to be created was Bitcoin back in 2009. Today there are hundreds of other crypto currencies, often referred to as Altcoins.

In this two hour presentation, the speaker will present the history, the technology, and the market of Bitcoin, Blockchain and crypto currencies in general.

 

 

Speaker Bio: Dr. William Kao received his BSEE, MSEE and PhD from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He worked in the Semiconductor and Electronic Design Automation industries formore than 30 years holding several senior and executive engineering management positions at Texas Instruments, Xerox Corporation, Cadence Design Systems.

Dr. Kao has authored more than 40 technical papers at IEEE Journals and Conferences, and holds eight software and IC design patents. He was an Adjunct Professor at UCLA Electrical EngineeringDepartment where he taught courses in computer aided IC design.

Dr. Kao is a Senior Member of IEEE, and was one of the founding members of IEEE-Circuits and Systems - Silicon Valley Chapter, where he was Chapter Chair in 2005 and 2006.

Dr. Kao currently teaches Renewable Energy, Clean Technology and Business Sustainability courses at the University of California Santa Cruz, Silicon Valley Extension.  

Dr. Kao current interests include the subjects of Energy, Environment and Education.

He teaches and is a frequent lecturer on various Emerging Technologies including Clean Technology, Renewable Energy, Business Sustainability, Big Data, IoT, Smart Cities, Sensor Networks, Innovation, Augmented Reality, Robotics, AI and 3D Printing.

 

7/15 [EECS] Building the Wireless On-ramp to the Internet of Things

Building the Wireless On-ramp to the Internet of Things

Speaker: 

Matthew Gast, Director of Technology, Aerohive Networks
Author of 6 books published by O’Reilly, 3 of them are related to WiFi
 
 
 

Date: 

July 15, 2015 (Wed.) 7:00 - 8:30 pm (Registration starts at 6:30pm)

Venue: 

ITRI International, 2870 Zanker Rd., Suite #140, San Jose, CA 95134. (Free Parking)

Register here: (Free event, please register in advance so we can prepare food and water.)

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1VxPKzzpxa5ylwDSunMCTUADaevwxMvUr5SuVDvWur4c/viewform?usp=send_form

 Abstract:
When machines have a conversation, what do they talk about?  But to even have the conversation, they must first connect.  For flexibility in deployment of massive numbers of sensors, the future network will be wireless.  Wi-Fi already carries half the Internet traffic, and with the explosion in the number of devices, that fraction is only set to grow, especially with the latest developments in the IEEE 802.11 family.  New devices place new demands on wireless networking expertise.  They outnumber users, but many of them do not impose the same performance demands on the network.  Building automation, physical security, and many wearables will result in higher-density networks, and the convergence of facilities with IT will place further stress on creaking wireless networks.  To cope with this new wave of demand, wireless networks must support higher density while enabling differentiated security models to support connecting everything you can image to the Internet.
Bio:

Matthew Gast is Director of Technology at Aerohive Networks, where he leads investigation into emerging technologies and their incorporation into the Aerohive network platform.

Matthew has actively contributed to the development of Wi-Fi technology through multiple industry groups. At the IEEE 802.11 working group, he served as the chair of the 802.11-2012 revision and as a task group officer during the development of 802.11u. At the Wi-Fi Alliance, he has led multiple task groups the past eight years, and currently leads all security-related activities at the Wi-Fi Alliance.

A noted author on networking, and Wi-Fi in particular, Matthew has written six books for O’Reilly Media that have collectively been translated into seven languages. In addition to the landmark 802.11 Wireless Networks: The Definitive Guide, now in its second edition, he is also the author of the companion volumes 802.11n: A Survival Guide and 802.11ac: A Survival Guide. Most recently, Matthew published Building Applications withiBeacon about location and proximity services. Matthew also contributes to O’Reilly’s emerging technology blog, the O’Reilly Radar.

An avid pilot, Matthew is often found somewhere in the vicinity of an airport, and always looks forward to the summer soaring season in the Sierra Nevada mountains.